Play Guitar in Seven Days


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Play Guitar in 7 Days: The new album from master Blue Ridge musician Jim Lloyd is now available to DJs and print media as a download or in hard copy CD.

Djs can download from Airplay Direct: http://bit.ly/JimLloydAirplayDirect

For CDs or other download options, media should contact Art Menius art@artmenius.com

Play Guitar in 7 Days

  1. Amelia Earhart (3:02) – Jim sings and picks the aviatrix ballad popularized in bluegrass music by The Country Gentlemen
  1. Darlin’ Cory (2:40) – one of the best known traditional songs in old-time & bluegrass, first recorded by Buell Kazee.
  1. Silver Bells (2:01) – a lovely demonstration of the rhythmic thumb picking guitar style Jim absorbed from his family. Selected for A Century of Heritage Guitar Music compilation.
  1. Cornbread & Butterbeans (3:14) – A celebration of the simple life recently popularized by the Carolina Chocolate Drops.
  1. Crazy (3:17) – The Willie Nelson – Patsy Cline standard picked with influences from both Chet Atkins and Doc Watson.
  1. Little Red Riding Hood (2:52) – a big hit for Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs done Lloyd-style
  1. Moody River Blues (2:47) – a song recorded by both Doc Watson and Pat Boone!
  1. My House Has Wheels (2:46) – A funny song from Southern Culture on the Skids
  1. Columbus Stockade Blues (3:16) – Doc Watson recorded and regularly performed this song
  1. Uncle Hiram’s Homemade Beer (3:17) – Dick Feller wrote and recorded this humorous warning to home brewers.
  1. St. James Infirmary (3:02) – Made a jazz standard by Louis Armstrong, this one has appeared in rock, pop, old-time, blues, R&B, and more genre.
  1. Must Come in at the Door (2:36) – a black gospel songs from the repertoire of Doc Watson
  1. Texas Rangers (4:07) – Jim sings a cowboy ballad best known from Tex Ritter’s recording.
  2. Forked Deer (2:13) – picking on a classic American fiddle tune

 

Recorded at Eastwood Studios

 

Produced by Wesley Easter & Jim Lloyd

 

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Classic Eno Festival Live Radio Show


Through an arrangement with the Festival for the Eno and the Southern Folklife Collection, I have been empowered to create a series of one-hour radio shows for all-volunteer non-commercial WHUP-LP radio in Hillsborough, NC. WHUP logo
Classic Eno Festival Live airs each Saturday at 11 AM Eastern on the 100 watt community station which live streams at whupfm.org. At any time, the two most recent shows are available for listening at https://whupfm.org/show/classic-eno-festival-live/.
I produce the show from live sets recorded in quite good quality at the Festival for the Eno in Durham, NC during the 1980s and early 1990s. Since July 1 we have broadcast episodes featuring the Seldom Scene, Red Clay Ramblers, George Higgs, Big Boy Henry, Lightnin’ Wells, Joe & Odell Thompson, the Badgett Sisters, and the Branchettes.

Paul Oliver, Pre-eminent Authority on the Blues, Dies at 90 – NYTimes.com


https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/08/17/arts/music/paul-oliver-authority-on-the-blues-dies-at-90.html?hpw&rref=obituaries&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&module=well-region®ion=bottom-well&WT.nav=bottom-well&referer=

Paul Oliver, a Briton who wrote some of the earliest and most authoritative histories of one of America’s great indigenous musical forms, the blues, died on Tuesday in Shipton-under-Wychwood, Oxfordshire, England. He was 90.
He is one of the last of the generation of amateur scholars who created serious study of and writing about American roots music. I was fortunate briefly to have met him.

Meet Ninja Phil — THE BITTER SOUTHERNER


http://bittersoutherner.com/the-south-in-labor-phil-cohen-jackson-project

Phil Cohen earned his nickname by being one of the most effective labor organizers ever in a region that has never been kind to unions. But Cohen is more than just an organizer: He is also a songwriter, an accomplished wildlife photographer, and now, the author of a powerful memoir that offers an uncommonly up close and personal look at the struggles of organized labor in the South.

Story By Art Menius | Photographs by Kate Medley